Everything You Need to Know About the 12 Month Sleep Regression.

12 Month Sleep Regression

The 12 month sleep regression is a phrase that’s thrown around a lot these days. It’s used to describe the difficulty that some children experience in sleeping in either one or both of the two time periods during which they might need to be awake and eat, due to changes in their circadian rhythm. These periods are typically 12-18 months and 18-24 months. In order to get through the 12 month sleep regression, it’s important for parents to know what it entails and how they can help their child through it. Here are some things you should know about the stages of sleep regression.

What is the 12 month sleep regression?

The 12 month sleep regression is a term that refers to the difficulty that some children experience in sleeping during these two periods. Children may need to be awake and eat at night because their circadian rhythm has shifted, causing them to have trouble getting back to sleep. It typically begins around the second year of life and can last until about 2-3 years old.

Most children will go through a 12 month sleep regression every year or so, with each one lasting from 1-2 months. If your child doesn’t experience a 12 months sleep regression in between 18-24 months, they might later on during their childhood.

During the 12 month sleep regression, your child’s biological clock shifts forward by an hour in relation to when it would normally be (usually during daylight hours). This shift causes several changes in behavior and physiology, including difficulty getting back to sleep and waking up more during the day than before.

Because of this shift, kids might not feel tired until many hours into the day, making it hard for them to fall asleep at night.

How does the work?

How to get through the 12 month sleep regression
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The 12 month sleep regression causes children to experience different sleep schedules, leading to a decrease in the total amount of sleep they get as well as an increase in the time they spend awake. These changes can be drastic, and it’s important for parents to understand these changes so that they can help their children get through the 12 month sleep regression.

Children of all ages will find it harder during this period to fall asleep and stay asleep. They might even experience difficulties staying in bed and sleeping long enough throughout the night. This means that if your child has been having trouble sleeping lately, this is likely to be a factor.

The 12-month-long sleep regression impacts everyone differently, but it typically starts around 12 months old and lasts until 18 months old with some variation based on individual circumstances. The good news is that once the regression is over, your child’s sleep should go back to normal.

The four phases

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There are four phases of the 12 month sleep regression:

– The first phase is with full night time sleep, where your child has a restful day and sleeps for eight hours straight.

– The second phase is when your child wakes up during the night, with bouts of waking that last for an hour or two at most.

– The third phase is when your child wakes up only once per night and falls back to sleep quickly.

– The fourth phase is when your child wakes up twice per night, but not always in the same pattern.

How to get through the 12 month sleep regression

It’s important to know how to get through the 12 month sleep regression. It’s a difficult time for both parents and children, and it doesn’t always happen at the same time for every child. Some children might experience it for 12 months, while others might experience it for 18 months.

One way to help your child get through the 12 month sleep regression is by making sure he goes back to sleep when he wakes up during the day. That way, you can make sure that your child gets enough daytime sleep so that he doesn’t have any difficulty staying asleep at night.

If your child has trouble going back to sleep after waking up during the day, you should encourage him to take a short nap in order to get some extra daytime sleep and then go right back into his bedtime routine when he wakes up again.

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Summary.

Sleep regression is a scientific term that refers to the period of time when a child has trouble sleeping during the night due to a change in their circadian rhythm.

Children typically experience this difficulty with their 12-18 month and 18-24 month sleep regressions. These periods are usually 12 months and 24 months apart. There are a few things that parents should know about this sleep regression, such as the importance of understanding what’s happening with their child’s sleep and how they can help them through it.

Parents will be able to help their children through the 12 months of sleep regression by staying on top of any changes in behavior or emotions that might lead to difficulty sleeping patterns. Additionally, parents should also encourage their children to take measures such as limiting screen time, getting enough exercise during the day, and establishing a bedtime routine if they’re struggling with falling asleep at night.

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